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[w.o.w.] formidable

from

FOR·MI·DA·BLE

from dictionary.com
[fawr-mi-duhbuhl]
 
adjective
 
1. causing fear, apprehension, or dread: a formidable opponent.
2. of discouraging or awesome strength, size, difficulty, etc.; intimidating: a formidable problem.
3. arousing feelings of awe or admiration because of grandeur, strength, etc.
4. of great strength; forceful; powerful: formidable opposition to the proposal.
 
Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < French < Latin formīdābilis  causing fear, equivalent to formīd-  (stem of formīdāre  to fear) + -ābilis -able
 
Related forms
for·mi·da·ble·ness, for·mi·da·bil·i·ty, noun
for·mi·da·bly, adverb
non·for·mi·da·bil·i·ty, noun
non·for·mi·da·ble, adjective
non·for·mi·da·ble·ness, noun
non·for·mi·da·b·ly, adverb
qua·si-for·mi·da·ble, adjective
qua·si-for·mi·da·b·ly, adverb
su·per·for·mi·da·ble, adjective
su·per·for·mi·da·ble·ness, noun
su·per·for·mi·da·b·ly, adverb
un·for·mi·da·ble, adjective
un·for·mi·da·ble·ness, noun
un·for·mi·da·b·ly, adverb
 
Can be confused:formative, formidable .
 

Synonyms
1.  dreadful, appalling, threatening, menacing, fearful, frightful, horrible.

Antonyms
1.  pleasant.

from thesaurus.com
Main Entry:
formidable
Part of Speech: adjective
Definition: horrible, terrifying
Synonyms: appalling, awful, dangerous, daunting, dire, dismaying, dreadful, fearful, fierce, frightful, horrific, imposing, impregnable, intimidating, menacing, redoubtable, shocking, terrible, terrific, threatening
Antonyms: feeble, friendly, harmless, nice, pleasant, powerless, weak

Same friend came up with yet another great sentence.

The child’s formidable gut and ham-hock fists proved to be a lucrative asset for his milk money collection business.

 

[w.o.w.] quixotic

from

QUIX·OT·IC

from dictionary.com

[kwik-sot-ik]

 adjective
 
1. ( sometimes initial capital letter ) resembling or befitting Don Quixote.
2. extravagantly chivalrous or romantic; visionary, impractical, or impracticable.
3. impulsive and often rashly unpredictable.
 
Also, quix·ot·i·cal
 
Origin:
1805–15; ( Don) Quixote + -ic
 

Related forms
quix·ot·i·cal·ly, adverb
half-quix·ot·ic, adjective
half-quix·ot·i·cal·ly, adverb
un·quix·ot·ic, adjective
un·quix·ot·i·cal, adjective
un·quix·ot·i·cal·ly, adverb

Synonyms
2.  fanciful, fantastic, imaginary.
 
Antonyms
2.  realistic, practical.
 
from thesaurus.com
Main Entry:
quixotic
Part of Speech: adjective
Definition: idealistic
Synonyms: chimerical, chivalrous, dreaming, dreamy, foolish, impetuous, impractical, impulsive, romantic, starry-eyed, unrealistic, utopian, visionary

Asked friend for another sentence,

The quixotic bureaucrat woke up one day to realize he existed only in irony… and went about his day working hard to lower the expectations of others.

Clever!  See why I always ask him?

 

[w.o.w.] avarice

I believe I also picked this word up from Dickens’ Oliver Twist.

from

“I believe that there is one story in the world, and only one. . . . Humans are caught—in their lives, in their thoughts, in their hungers and ambitions, in their avarice and cruelty, and in their kindness and generosity too—in a net of good and evil. . . . There is no other story. A man, after he has brushed off the dust and chips of his life, will have left only the hard, clean questions: Was it good or was it evil? Have I done well—or ill?” ― John Steinbeck, East of Eden

 

AV·A·RICE

from dictionary.com

[av-er-is]

noun
 
insatiable greed for riches; inordinate, miserly desire to gain and hoard wealth.
 
Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English < Old French < Latin avāritia,  equivalent to avār ( us ) greedy + -itia -ice
 
Synonyms
cupidity.
 
from thesaurus.com
 
Part of Speech: noun
Definition: extreme greed
Synonyms: avidity, close-fistedness, covetousness, cupidity, frugality, grabbiness, greediness, miserliness, niggardliness, parsimony, penny- pinching, penuriousness, rapacity, stinginess, thrift
Antonyms: generosity, philanthropy

 

Asked same friend for another sentence,

Consumed by his own avarice for pork rinds, the portly pollack soon had no room for momma’s kielbasa.

Funny and disgusting all in one; bravo!

 

“Avarice” by Georges Barbier – 1924

from

 

 

[w.o.w.] squalid

This weekend I watched the newly re-made, two-part mini-series of Masterpiece’s Dickens’ Oliver.  It was so well done!  I picked up this word from it.

from

SQUAL·ID

from dictionary.com

[skwol-id, skwaw-lid]

adjective

 
1. foul and repulsive, as from lack of care or cleanliness; neglected and filthy.
2. wretched; miserable; degraded; sordid.
 
Origin:
1585–95; < Latin squālidus  dirty, equivalent to squāl ( ēre ) to be dirty, encrusted + -idus -id4

Related forms

squal·id·ly, adverb
squal·id·ness, squa·lid·i·ty, noun
 
Synonyms
1. unclean. See dirty.
 
from thesaurus.com
 
Part of Speech: adjective
Definition: poor, run-down
Synonyms: abominable, base, broken-down, decayed, despicable, dingy, dirty, disgusting, disheveled, fetid, filthy, foul, grimy, gruesome, horrible, horrid, ignoble, impure, low, mean, miry, moldy, muddy, musty, nasty, odorous, offensive, poverty-stricken, ramshackle, reeking, repellent, repulsive, scurvy, seedy, shabby, shoddy, sloppy, slovenly, soiled, sordid, ugly, unclean, unkempt, vile, wretched
Antonyms: clean, good, kept-up, rich
 
Asked friend for another sentence.  Apparently he’s quite a fan of alliteration.
 
The squirmy squid squirted squalid ink at Sasquatch, who squinted through it to squash said squid with his soild Sketchers.
 
Oy vey!
 
Here’s mine:
 
Lexington Market may seem a squalid environment, but with the right perspective a few entertaining treasures may be found.
 
If you’ve been to Lexington Market in Baltimore you understand.
 
 

[w.o.w.] iniquitous

here’s a word I picked up from watching Downton Abbey!

from

IN·IQ·UI·TOUS

from dictionary.com

[ih-nik-wi-tuhs]

adjective

characterized by injustice or wickedness; wicked; sinful.
 
Origin:
1720–30; iniquit(y) + -ous

Related forms

in·iq·ui·tous·ly, adverb
in·iq·ui·tous·ness, noun
un·in·iq·ui·tous, adjective
un·in·iq·ui·tous·ly, adverb
un·in·iq·ui·tous·ness, noun
 
Synonyms
flagitious, nefarious, perverse, evil, base, unjust, wrong.
 
Antonyms
righteous.
 
from thesaurus.com 
Part of Speech: adjective
Definition: unjust
Synonyms: evil, sinful, unfair, vicious, wicked
 
Asked same friend for another “clever” sentence:
 
The child’s iniquitous behavior forced his father’s hand; it was time to shoot the dog.
 
Please don’t have kids, friend – stick to something simple like goldfish.
 
 

[w.o.w.] brouhaha

(from)

BROU · HA · HA

from dictionary.com
noun

1. excited public interest, discussion, or the like, as the clamor attending some sensational event; hullabaloo: The brouhaha followed disclosures of graft at City Hall.
2. an episode involving excitement, confusion, turmoil, etc., especially a broil over a minor or ridiculous cause: A brouhaha by the baseball players resulted in three black eyes.
 
Origin:
1885–90; < French, orig. brou, ha, ha!  exclamation used by characters representing the devil in the 16th-cent. drama; perhaps < Hebrew, distortion of the recited phrase bārūkh habbā  ( beshēm ădhōnai ) “blessed is he who comes (in the name of the Lord)” (Ps. 118:26)
 
from thesaurus.com
 
Part of Speech: noun
Definition: uproar
Synonyms: ado, fracas, melee, row, setto, to-do
Same friend came up with another sentence, however I had forgotten his being called “El Presidente” as a joke by some of his grad school friends…
 
El Presidente’s arrival at town square just as his loyal citizens were beginning their weeklong celebration of his birth, set off a festive brouhaha.
 
Haha – delusional much, friend?
 
 

[w.o.w.] pachyderm

(from)

 

PACH · Y · DERM

 

from dictionary.com
noun

1. any of the thick-skinned, nonruminant ungulates, as the elephant, hippopotamus, and rhinoceros.
2. an elephant.
3. a person who is not sensitive to criticism, ridicule, etc.; a thick-skinned person.
 
from thesaurus.com
Part of Speech: noun
Definition: nonruminant hoofed mammal
Synonyms: elephant, hippopotamus, mammoth, mastodon, rhinoceros
 
I asked a friend to come up with a sentence using this word of the week, and here goes:
John McCain is such an old Republican, you might as well just call him a pachyderm.
 
Well played, friend. Well played indeed.
 
 
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